The GRAMMYs

Over the past two decades, a curious musical insurgency has raged on the outermost fringes of the international music scene. Dubbed “post-rock,” this burgeoning movement was pioneered by ambitious bands who largely discarded vocals and traditional verse-chorus structures in favor of euphoria-inducing song cycles. Now, eccentric outliers such as Canada’s Godspeed You! Black Emperor, Scottland’s Mogwai, Iceland’s Sigur Rós, and Chicago-based Tortoise are increasingly being recognized as rock visionaries.

Read the full article Explosions In The Sky, Mogwai And Sigur Rós Have Post-Rock Euphoria’

(Source: Spotify)

With the 55th Annual GRAMMY Awards just one week away, it’s time to gear up for the exciting lineup of performances we have in store for this year’s show. Some of your favorite artists, from the Black Keys, Fun., Rihanna, and Taylor Swift, to the Lumineers, Carrie Underwood and Jack White, will take the GRAMMY stage this year to give you what will undoubtedly be the Super Bowl of music.
But before GRAMMY Sunday, there’s Super Bowl Sunday on Feb. 3, featuring the Baltimore Ravens versus the San Francisco 49ers. And what does everyone look forward to (aside from, of course, the actual game and million-dollar commercials)? The halftime show. Musical performances during the big game date back to Super Bowl I in 1967 when jazz trumpeter Al Hirt and the University of Arizona and Grambling State University marching bands took the field to provide the entertainment. But the halftime show has since gotten bigger. A lot bigger. Now resembling a stadium concert production, GRAMMY-winning artists from Michael Jackson and Tom Petty to Madonna, Prince and U2 have taken the field to perform what their fans (and the GRAMMYs) love most about them — their music.
So as you get all the fixings ready for your big Super Bowl party, pop in this playlist of GRAMMY-winning and -nominated halftime songs from Super Bowls past.
Listen.

With the 55th Annual GRAMMY Awards just one week away, it’s time to gear up for the exciting lineup of performances we have in store for this year’s show. Some of your favorite artists, from the Black Keys, Fun., Rihanna, and Taylor Swift, to the Lumineers, Carrie Underwood and Jack White, will take the GRAMMY stage this year to give you what will undoubtedly be the Super Bowl of music.

But before GRAMMY Sunday, there’s Super Bowl Sunday on Feb. 3, featuring the Baltimore Ravens versus the San Francisco 49ers. And what does everyone look forward to (aside from, of course, the actual game and million-dollar commercials)? The halftime show. Musical performances during the big game date back to Super Bowl I in 1967 when jazz trumpeter Al Hirt and the University of Arizona and Grambling State University marching bands took the field to provide the entertainment. But the halftime show has since gotten bigger. A lot bigger. Now resembling a stadium concert production, GRAMMY-winning artists from Michael Jackson and Tom Petty to Madonna, Prince and U2 have taken the field to perform what their fans (and the GRAMMYs) love most about them — their music.

So as you get all the fixings ready for your big Super Bowl party, pop in this playlist of GRAMMY-winning and -nominated halftime songs from Super Bowls past.

Listen.

Songs For The Money Makers

More than 120 years ago thousands of New Yorkers marched from City Hall to Union Square, down 42nd street and toward Wendel’s Elm Park where they gathered for food, music and demonstrations in what was America’s first Labor Day celebration. The idea for a workers’ holiday is said to have emerged from the ranks of organized labor during a time when workers wished to demonstrate the strength of this burgeoning movement and advocate for improvements in working conditions. The trend eventually caught on, inspiring similar events across the country. In 1887 Oregon became the first state to grant legal status to the holiday and in 1894 Congress passed legislation declaring Labor Day a national holiday.

Throughout the following decades workers viewed the holiday as an opportunity to celebrate their accomplishments while fighting for better working conditions and salaries. These days, the first Monday in September is often associated less with union activities and protests, and instead is a time for eating, drinking, sporting, and paying homage to summer’s last hurrah.

So whether you’re working on a dream, taking a break from your 9 to 5, or enjoying your mo’ money (and thinking about your mo’ problems), take it easy with this GRAMMY Labor Day playlist.

On May 5, 1868, three years following the end of the Civil War, the Grand Army of the Republic established Decoration Day, encouraging the nation to decorate the graves of fallen war veterans with flowers. By the end of the 19th century memorial ceremonies were celebrated on May 30 across the nation, and by 1971 Congress officially declared every last Monday in May as Memorial Day.

In December 2000 the National Moment of Remembrance Act was passed and signed into law by President George W. Bush in an effort to ensure that those sacrifices made by America’s fallen heroes were never forgotten. The act encourages all Americans to participate in a minute of silence wherever they may be at 3 p.m. on Memorial Day.

Once those 60 seconds have passed we encourage you to crank up the tunes in honor of those brave soldiers who have sacrificed their lives in the name of freedom with our GRAMMY Memorial Day playlist.